Grammarly Review: Improve Your Blogging (Automatically)

Blog Tools

grammarly reviewHow's your grammar?

Oh, is that a bit of a sensitive topic?

While grammar issues might irritate us, no one wants their writing to be exposed to heartless criticism.

As a blogger, you need to know the rules. Take the time to learn basic grammar and you'll forever improve your writing.

A book like The Little Red Writing Book explains the rules in a simple, memorable way. There's a complete section that covers 30 Rules of Grammar.

But knowing the rules sometimes isn't enough.

Grammarly Review Video

Watch on YouTube

What Does Grammarly Do?

Grammarly is like having a proofreader on staff. It proofs automatically – according to the parameters that you've set.

grammarly logoHere are the eight settings you can control:

  1. Contextual Spelling: Bases spelling on context – not just the fact that a specific word is in the dictionary. Helps correct common errors such as affect/effect, lie/lay, there/their/they're and lose/loose.
  2. Grammar: Checks for subject-verb agreement, misused articles and consistent verb form and tenses.
  3. Punctuation: Checks for missing and redundant punctuation.
  4. Sentence structure: Identifies misplaced words and faulty word order.
  5. Style: Helps reduce redundancy and wordiness.
  6. Plagiarism: Finds copied text by comparing against a database of eight billion web pages.
  7. Vocabulary enhancement: Provides related word suggestions to improve your writing.
  8. Professional proofreading: Document is sent to a real person who will manually check your writing and send it back to you (additional cost).

Document types: You also have control to assign a specific document type to your document. Choose from general, academic, business, technical, medical, creative, and casual. Each of these categories have a number of sub-categories that will proof-read your document appropriately.

What I Love About Grammarly

The format is very good. Just copy/paste (or upload) your document and you'll automatically see errors and suggestions for your writing. Just click the suggestions and your copy is immediately updated. You can then download your edited documents in their original format.

For our upcoming Expat Family Handbook (will publish on GringosAbroad) we interviewed 14 families living all around the world. We ran each of these interviews through the application and we were surprised at how thorough it is. Not only did it save us 20-30 hours of manual editing, it also significantly improved the quality by removing redundant words and correcting errant punctuation. (Update: Book published on November 28, 2014)

What Grammarly is Missing

After a full three months of use, there is just one feature that is missing: integration with WordPress.

WordPress integration: When I began the review, there was only one way to use Grammarly. Online. You needed to either copy/paste or upload the file to the site. I asked about integration with Word and WordPress. They told me that both integrations were coming.

They recently added Microsoft Office (Word and Outlook) integration. I expect to see WordPress integration shortly. I do about 90% of my writing inside of WordPress. Even without this feature, it is an amazing tool. Just copy/paste your post into the tool, see what needs to be fixed and then copy it back into WordPress. With this format, you'll want to wait to format and add links until after it is proofed in Grammarly. Otherwise, you'll have to format your post again. grammarly review

Should You Use Grammarly? 

Maybe.

If you are a casual blogger, it probably isn't that important.

If blogging is fundamental to your business then good grammar is important. You should consider Grammarly.

If you accept guest posts or run written interviews, this tool will save you huge amounts of time – and ensure the quality of what you publish. Students and office workers would also benefit from this application. It not only saves time, but it will keep you from making embarrassing mistakes.

Try it now: Try Grammarly for free for seven days

Note: I was given 90 days of free access to this product by Grammarly. The links to Grammarly in this post are affiliate links and I will receive a commission should you choose to purchase this service. You pay the same either way. 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Hi, I'm the Author!

Bryan Haines is a travel blogger, photographer and content marketer. He is co-founder of Storyteller Media (content marketing for travel brands). Bryan also runs two authority blogs with his wife, Dena: ClickLikeThis (GoPro tutorials) and GringosAbroad (Ecuador travel).

3 comments… add one
  • Nathan Ambrose Sep 1, 2014, 4:31 pm

    Hi Brian.

    Thanks for writing that article. I’m passionate about correct spelling and grammar, and I tried Grammarly recently. It was reassuring to know that I am doing well with that.

    I think that the use of correct grammar is important, even for the casual blogger. People like us notice the difference easily.

  • Christie Krull Sep 1, 2014, 2:46 pm

    Thanks for sharing this! I can’t wait to try it out. I could use an objective editor for my first run through! I appreciate all of your pros and cons you discuss. This helps a lot.

  • Andre Hugo Sep 1, 2014, 12:55 pm

    Unless I am particularly rushed, I run my writing past Grammarly, which I have been using for several years. I make few mistakes; but, there is almost always something.

    Grammarly addresses “English” not cockney slang, Canadian or American. As someone who speaks Canadian English, French and Spanish, I sometimes mix my spellings. Many of the sites in Canada use American spell checkers and, as a Canadian, it is sometimes frustrating when I write in Canadian English and am told that I am wrong.
    My most unliked mistakes that I see, far too often, are:
    – Using “me” as a subject pronoun placed before another person. Eg – “Me and my friend.” With respect, one should always put the other person first – “My friend and I.”
    – Not knowing the differences between “then” and “than” ; or, “bring” and “take”.
    I didn’t run this comment through Grammarly.

Leave a Comment